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    Automatic application discovery is driven by the way end users access and request services from your business applications. End users access the web application through a URL, and App Visibility provides a way to name applications by identifying common HTTP/HTTPS URL constructions and patterns.

    You, as an application specialist, can configure application discovery so that you can group requests with a common purpose under one application name, and separate requests with different purposes accordingly.

    For example, suppose users access your application through one of the following URLs:

    • http://news.mycompany.com/today
    • http://blog.mycompany.com/by-department/mobile-products
    • http://photos.mycompany.com/events/ReleaseCelebration

    Depending on your requirements, you can group all of these requests under one application name, My Company, or separate them under different application names: My Company news, My Company blog, and My Company photos.

    You can also identify and discard requests that are not relevant to your application monitoring environment, for example, requests that originate from the application servers and not from end users.

    This topic describes the following topics:

    Parts of a URL

    The name of an automatically discovered application is determined by the application's HTTP/HTTPS URL. You can configure the application discovery based on pattern matching in the domain, path, or both. The parts of the URL are displayed in the following diagram.

    Parts of a URL

    • The domain part of the URL includes the host name (www), subdomain (if applicable), domain (example), and the top-level domain (com).
    • The path part of the URL is the full path to the resource. For example, the path can include the directory (weather) and file (today.jsp) names.
      Path segments are separated by a slash character ( / ).
    • App Visibility application discovery does not use the protocol or query parts of the URL.

    Other URL protocols, such as JMS or RMI, are not supported for application discovery.

    Before you begin

    • Install and configure  App Visibility components.
    • To perform this procedure, you must have Application Administrator-level access.

    Configuring application discovery

    You can tune the application discovery, grouping some applications together, separating some, and discarding those that are not useful for your evaluation. Define patterns in the application URL to configure the application discovery. Rules are implemented in the order of the list: after a rule applies to a request, the following rules are ignored for that request.

    1. From the TrueSight console navigation pane, select Configuration > Application Discovery.
    2. From the Application Discovery Rules action menu, select Edit.
    3. Add a discovery rule using one of the following methods:
      • To add a rule to the top of the list, from the Edit Application Discovery Rules action menu, select Add Rule.
      • To add a rule under an existing rule, click the Add Rule icon.
    4. Select Path or Domain and enter the required pattern.
      • Rules can include only alphanumeric Latin characters, spaces, and the following characters:
        ! " # $ % & ' ( ) * + , - . : ; < = > ? @ [ ] ^ _ ` { | } ~
      • Path names are case sensitive, although they might be treated as case insensitive by some servers.
      • You can use a wildcard (*) to represent a part of the domain or a part of the path, but not both.

      Examples of wildcard use in the Domain or Path fields

      • Match part of the domain name

        Domain: *.mycompany.com

      • Match part of the path for a specific domain

        Path: /app/*

        Only if domain is: corporate-intranet.com

      For more examples, see Examples of application discovery rules, below.

    5. Select Map to name, and enter a name or name pattern, or select Discard to remove the application.

      If you used a wildcard (*) in the Domain or Path fields, you can enter the wildcard as part of the application name. In the application name, the wildcard represents the same string that it represents in the domain or path.

      Ensure that the resulting application name is no longer than 255 characters. Application names greater than 255 characters are not displayed in the TrueSight console.

      Example of wildcard use in the application name

      If you use a wildcard in the Domain field, such as, *.mycompany.com, you can use a wildcard in the Map to name field, such as, My Company *.

      For more examples, see Examples of application discovery rules, below.

    6. Click the Enter icon to confirm the addition of the rule.

      Warning

      After you enter or edit a rule, it is not saved in the system until you click the Save button.

    7. Click the Move Up or Move Down arrows to adjust the order of the rules.
      Rules are implemented in the order of the list: after a rule applies to a request, the following rules are ignored for that request.
    8. Click Save.

    Examples of application discovery rules

    The following examples show how to define rules to show descriptive application names:

    Match part of the domain name, wildcard in name

    Domain: *.mycompany.com

    Map to name: My Company *

    Examples

    http://news.mycompany.com/today maps to the My Company news application

    http://blog.mycompany.com/by-department/mobile-products maps to the My Company blog application

    http://photos.mycompany.com/events/ReleaseCelebration maps to the My Company photos application

    Match part of the domain name, fixed name

    Domain: *.mycompany.com

    Map to name: My Company

    Examples

    http://news.mycompany.com/today maps to the My Company application

    http://blog.mycompany.com/by-department/mobile-products maps to the My Company application

    http://photos.mycompany.com/events/ReleaseCelebration maps to the My Company application

    Match part of the path for a specific domain

    Path: /app/*

    Only if domain is: corporate-intranet.com

    Map to name: *

    Examples

    http://corporate-intranet.com/app/jobs/US/Northwest maps to the jobs application

    http://corporate-intranet.com/app/news maps to the news application

    http://corporate-intranet.com/app/community/OutreachPrograms maps to the community application

    Discard specific requests

    Path: /support-console

    Discard

    Examples

    http://corporate-intranet.com/support-console is not part of the system

     

     

    Preconfigured application discovery rules

    Rule
    Description

    Example
    OrderMatchAction
    1Domain: www.*.comMap to name: *If a domain starts with www. and ends with .com, use the subdomain and domain part of the URL as the application name.For http://www.mycompany.com/today , the application name is mycompany.
    2Domain: *.comMap to name: *If a URL domain ends with .com, use everything before this top-level domain part of the URL as the application name.For http://www.mycompany.com/today , the application name is www.mycompany.
    3Domain: localhostDiscardDiscard requests that originate from the application servers.The http://localhost/test request is not part of the system.
    4Domain: 127.0.0.1Discard

    Discard requests that originate from the application servers.

    The http://127.0.0.1/test request is not part of the system.
    5Domain: [::1]DiscardDiscard requests that originate from the application servers.The http://[::1]/test request is not part of the system.
    6Domain: *Map to name: *Use the domain part of the URL as the application name.For http://www.mycompany.org/today, the application name is www.mycompany.org.

    Considerations for changing discovery rules

    Consider the following changes to application discovery rules and how they affect the discovered applications.

    New definition maps to an application with the same name 

    With the default rules in place, the domain rule www.*.com maps your domain www.mycompany.com to the application name mycompany.

    Later, you add a rule that explicitly maps www.mycompany.com to the application name mycompany.

    Result: The application discovery rules continue data collection for the application with the same name.

    New definition maps to an application with a different name

    You add a rule that explicitly maps www.mycompany.com to the application name mycompany.

    Later, you change the rule to map www.mycompany.com to the application name myWEBcompany.

    Result: The application discovery rules create a new application. Data collection stops for the previous application. If you do not need the historical data associated with the previous application, you can delete the application. See Viewing managed applications.

    Where to go from here

    Perform one or more of the following procedures:

    Related topics

    Setting up applications for monitoring

    Setting up and managing synthetic transaction monitoring

    Application models

    Troubleshooting: Automatically discovered application model does not reflect the application structure