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    Product Name
    Tuxedo
    Publisher Page
    BEA
    Category
    Transaction Processing Monitors
    Release
    TKU 2019-Jul-1
    Change History
    BEA Tuxedo - Change History
    Reports & Attributes
    BEA Tuxedo - Reports & Attributes
    Publisher Link
    BEA

    Product Description

    Tuxedo (Transactions for Unix, Extended for Distributed Operations) is a middleware platform used to manage distributed transaction processing in distributed computing environments. Tuxedo is a Transaction Processing System or Transaction Oriented Middleware or Enterprise Application Server for C, C++, and COBOL.

    It was originally developed and designed by AT&T in 1983 for the creation and administration of Operations Support Systems that required online transaction processing (OLTP) capabilities. The Tuxedo concepts were derived from the LMOS system. The original Tuxedo team was comprised of seasoned members of the LMOS team. In 1993 Novell acquired the UNIX System Laboratories (USL) division of AT&T which was responsible for the development of Tuxedo at the time. In 1996, BEA Systems made an exclusive agreement with Novell to develop and distribute Tuxedo on non-NetWare platforms, with most Novell employees working with Tuxedo joining BEA.

    Tuxedo was designed from the beginning for high availability and to provide extremely scalable applications allowing Tuxedo to support applications requiring thousands of transactions per second on commonly available distributed systems. One of the first applications within AT&T for Tuxedo was to support moving the LMOS application off mainframe systems on to much cheaper distributed systems.

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