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Searching in the My Cloud Services console

A search field appears on several pages of the My Cloud Services console. The following sections describe how search works for each page:

For all searches you enter in the Search field, each word in each search string must be between 2 and 30 characters. (For example, you might enter San Jose, and both words are used in the search. If you enter San J, only San is used because J is only one character.) There is no limit on the number of characters in an entire search string.

Note

A "search string" is a combination of one or more words. A set of two or more characters (for example, SJ) is considered a "word."

Searching the Catalog

  • Multiple search strings—Multiple search strings are treated as AND operations. The results display any offerings that match all of the strings. For example, if you enter Windows (and press Enter) and then enter Word (and press Enter), the results will display all offerings that include Windows and Word.

    Note

    You can enter two or more words in a single search string. For example, you might enter file system (and press Enter). Then, if you enter Windows (and press Enter), the results will display offerings that include file or system, and Windows.
  • Filters—If you select more than one filter (from the FILTER section in the left column), the search uses the OR operator. The results display offerings that match any filter listed in the search field. (Your administrator configures filters for you from categories and keywords.)
  • Search strings and filters—If you enter search strings and one filter, the AND operator is used. The results display offerings that match the search strings and the filter. (You cannot add more than one filter when you include search strings in the search field.)
  • Case insensitivity—Searches are case insensitive. For example, if you enter windows, the results are the same as a search for Windows.
  • Wildcards—Implicit wildcards are assumed at the beginning and ending of search terms. For example, if you enter W2k8, the results will display offerings that include VMW-W2k8-64B-20GB,W2k8-20GB-BSA8501-119, and so on. Wildcard searches that explicitly use the * character are not supported.
  • Spaces in a search string—To search on a string that includes spaces, use quotation marks to treat the string as a single searchable string (which uses the AND operator). For example, if you enterfile system”, the results display offerings where any part of the offering contains file system. If you enter file system (without quotation marks), the results display offerings where any part of the offering contains file or system (or both).
  • Escaping characters in a search string—If a search string includes a double quotation mark, escape the quotation mark by using a backslash (\).  For, example, enter 42\” to search for 42”, and  enter “42\” long” to search for 42” long.

    If a backslash is part of the search string (with or without spaces), escape the backslash with an additional backslash. For example, enter \\mydirectory\\myfile.jsp to search for \mydirectory\myfile.jsp.
  • Searching for an operating system—When searching on the Catalog page, Operating System is not included in the search. For example, if you see ami-901c74a0 listed as the operating system for a catalog offering, entering ami-901c74a0 will not provide any results.

Searching the Activity Log or My Requests

  • Multiple search strings—Multiple search strings are treated as AND operations. The results display any activities or requests that match all of the strings. For example, if you enter Windows (and press Enter) and then enter Word (and press Enter), the results will display all activities or requests that include Windows and Word.

    Note

    You can enter two or more words in a single search string. For example, you might enter file system (and press Enter). Then, if you enter Windows (and press Enter), the results will display activities or requests that include file or system, and Windows.
  • Filters—If you select more than one filter (from the FILTER section in the left column), the search uses the OR operator. The results display any activities or requests that match any filter listed in the search field.

    The Filter list displays the list of filters that is relevant to the content in the right side of the window. As more content appears across different categories, the filter list adjusts dynamically. For example, if no requests are currently in the Processing state, then that filter category will not appear as a filter.
  • Search strings and filters—If you enter search strings and one filter, the AND operator is used. The results display activities or requests that match the search strings and the filter. You cannot add more than one filter when you include search strings in the search field.
  • Case insensitivity—Searches are case insensitive. For example, if you enter decommission, the results are the same as a search for Decommission.
  • Wildcards—Implicit wildcards are assumed at the beginning and ending of search terms. For example, if you enter india, the results will display activities or requests that include india3, india-southEng-India, and so on. Wildcard searches that explicitly use the * character are not supported.
  • Spaces in a search string—To search on a string that includes spaces, use quotation marks to treat the string as a single searchable string (which uses the AND operator). For example, if you enterSan Jose”, the results display activities or requests where any part of the entry contains San Jose. If you enter San Jose (without quotation marks), the results display activities or requests where any part of the entry contains San or Jose (or both).
  • Escaping characters in a search string—If a search string includes a double quotation mark, escape the quotation mark by using a backslash (\).  For, example, enter 42\” to search for 42”, and  enter “42\” long” to search for 42” long.

    If a backslash is part of the search string (with or without spaces), escape the backslash with an additional backslash. For example, enter \\mydirectory\\myfile.jsp to search for \mydirectory\myfile.jsp.
  • Date searches—If you want to search for a date, use the format for your locale. For example, if your locale uses the MM/DD/YYYY format, enter 03/15/2015. Do not include a timestamp.

Searching the Resource List

  • Multiple search strings—Multiple search strings are treated as AND operations. The results display any resources that match all of the strings. For example, if you enter Windows (and press Enter) and then enter Word (and press Enter), the results will display all resources that include Windows and Word.

    Note

     You can enter two or more words in a single search string. For example, you might enter file system (and press Enter). Then, if you enter Windows (and press Enter), the results will display records that include file or system, and Windows.
  • Filters—If you select more than one filter (from the FILTER section in the left column), the search uses the AND operator. The results display any resources that match any filter listed in the search field.
  • Search strings and filters—If you enter search strings and one or more filters, the AND operator is used. The results display resources that match the search strings and the filters.
  • Case insensitivity—Searches are case insensitive. For example, if you enter Windows, the results are the same as a search for windows.
  • Wildcards—Implicit wildcards are assumed at the beginning and ending of search terms. For example, if you enter india, the results will display resources such as india3, india-southEng-India, and so on. Wildcard searches that explicitly use the * character are not supported.
  • Operators—You can use the following search operators:
    • equals (=)
    • greater than (>)
    • less than (<),
    • greater than or equal to (>=)
    • less than or equal to (<=)

For example, you can search the Operating System column for Windows servers by entering the following search: Operating System=Windows.

    • The = operator—If you use the equals operator (=), the search is case sensitive, and the value must be an exact match (no implicit wildcards are added to the beginning and end). For example, if you enter Operating System=Linux, the results would differ from a search for Operating System=LINUX. The results of both of those searches would also differ from a search for Operating System=GNU/Linux. Consequently, using the = operator on a specific column is the same as filtering the column by a specific value.
    • Other operators—The >, <, >=, <= operators can be used only on the Provisioned, Decommission, CPU, and Resources columns. A search for CPU>1 will return all results where the CPU column has a value greater than 1. A search for  Provisioned>=02/23/2015 will return all results where the Provisioned column has a date greater than (more recent than) or equal to February 23, 2015. Enter the date in the format you see displayed in the Resource List.
  • Spaces in a search string—To search on a string that includes spaces, use quotation marks to treat the string as a single searchable string (which uses the AND operator). For example, if you enterSan Jose”, the results display rows where any column has a value that contains San Jose. If you enter San Jose (without quotation marks), the results display rows where any column has a value that contains San or Jose (or both).
  • Escaping characters in a search string—If a search string includes a double quotation mark, escape the quotation mark by using a backslash (\).  For, example, enter 42\” to search for 42”, and  enter “42\” long” to search for 42” long.

    If a backslash is part of the search string (with or without spaces), escape the backslash with an additional backslash. For example, enter \\mydirectory\\myfile.jsp to search for \mydirectory\myfile.jsp.
  • When using operators, you cannot combine multiple searches within one encapsulated block (also called a “pill”). Each search must be in a separate encapsulated block. For example, this search would not work:
     

    But this search would work:

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