Important

   

This space contains documentation for TrueSight Server Automation 8.9.03 and the later service packs for 8.9. For earlier releases, see BMC Server Automation 8.9.

Testing the script results

Assuming your job ran successfully (see Creating and running a job that uses the NSH script), you can now examine your enrolled servers to see if the script correctly set MY_PROPERTY to the value "some Value". You can test results by using the BLCLI or the BMC Server Automation Console:

Testing the script results by using the BLCLI

  1. Start NSH, authenticate, and connect to the Application Server as described in Setting up to run BLCLI commands in an NSH shell.
  2. Use the Server printPropertyValue command to display the current value of MY_PROPERTY. For the first argument, pass in the host name of a server enrolled in your system.
    MY_NSH_PROMPT% blcli_execute Server printPropertyValue "myServer" "MY_PROPERTY"
    The command returns the value of MY_PROPERTY. In this case, the script correctly set it to "some Value".
    some ValueMY_NSH_PROMPT%

You have successfully completed the following:

  • Run a BLCLI command at the CLI.
  • Examined an NSH script that uses BLCLI commands.
  • Run the NSH script.
  • Verified the script results.

Where to go from here

Before going on to use other BLCLI commands in your own scripts, take a look at BLCLI tips.

Testing the script results by using the BMC Server Automation Console

  1. Expand the Servers folder and navigate to one of your servers.
  2. Click the server name and note that Basic properties for the server appear in the lower left panel, as follows:
  3. The property you added at the beginning of this tutorial (MY_PROPERTY) is an Extended property, so expand the Extended node (that is, click the plus sign).
  4. Scroll through the Extended properties until you reach MY_PROPERTY. Note that it is correctly set to "some Value" as specified in the script.

You have successfully completed the following:

  • Run a BLCLI command at the command line.
  • Examined an NSH script that uses BLCLI commands.
  • Run the NSH script.
  • Verified the script results.

Where to go from here

Before going on to use other BLCLI commands in your own scripts, take a look at BLCLI tips.

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