This documentation refers to a previously released version of BMC Discovery.
See the information on this topic for the latest version (11.2) or version 11.0.

The netadmin user is the preferred way of configuring networking

The preferred way of administering any of the appliance network configuration is to use the netadmin user account. The netadmin user account enables you to change network, hostname and gateway settings without requiring root privileges. You can also use the netadmin user to reboot the appliance.

Setting a static IP address for the first interface (eth0) requires the following steps:

  1. Obtain networking information.
  2. Stop the tideway services
  3. Edit the network configuration files.
  4. Restart networking.
  5. Restart the tideway services.

Impact of your configuration changes

After changing the IP address, if the appliance belongs to a cluster you must change its address using Cluster Management. If the appliance is not clustered, you must delete the /usr/tideway/etc/cluster.conf file and either restart the cluster services or reboot. The file is recreated with the new address.

Obtaining networking information

You must obtain the following information before starting:

  • IP Address: in this example 192.168.0.100
  • Netmask: in this example 255.255.255.0
  • Gateway: in this example 192.168.0.1

Consult your system administrator for this information.

Stopping the Tideway services

Before changing any networking configuration, you must stop the following services:

  • tideway
  • cluster
  • omniNames
  • appliance

To do this, as the tideway user, enter the following:

[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service tideway stop
[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service cluster stop
[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service omniNames stop
[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service appliance stop

Editing the network configuration files

Edit Network Configuration Files Using the Console

Ensure you are on the console or have access to the console before making any networking changes.

The appliance is configured by default to use DHCP. To configure it to use a static IP address, you must edit the /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 file as root. In addition to the network settings obtained previously, you need to determine the MAC address of the network card.

To do this:

  1. Enter the following command:

    [tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/ifconfig eth0
    eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:0C:29:BB:34:6D
    ...
    [tideway@london01 ~]$ 
    

    The MAC address is given after the heading HWaddr. In this example, the MAC address is 00:0C:29:BB:34:6D.
    The following example shows the default ifcg-eth0file :

    DEVICE=eth0
    BOOTPROTO=dhcp
    DHCPCLASS=
    ONBOOT=yes
    
  2. Edit the /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0and add the values obtained above. The file will look like this:

    DEVICE=eth0
    BOOTPROTO=static
    HWADDR=00:0C:29:BB:34:6D
    TYPE=Ethernet
    ONBOOT=yes
    IPADDR=192.168.0.100
    NETMASK=255.255.255.0
    
  3. Add the gateway address to the /etc/sysconfig/network file.
    You can edit the appliance hostname, but you must ensure that it still resolves correctly. See Changing the appliance hostname for more information.

The file will look like this:

NETWORKING=yes
NETWORKING_IPV6=yes
HOSTNAME=london01
GATEWAY=192.168.0.1

Restarting networking

You must restart networking to make sure that the changes have been applied correctly. To do this, enter:

[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service network restart
[tideway@london01 ~]$

When networking starts, enter the following commands to ensure that the new networking information is showing correctly and that the appliance can resolve its own hostname correctly:

[tideway@london01 ~]$ /sbin/ifconfig eth0
eth0      Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:0C:29:BB:34:6D
          inet addr:192.168.0.100 Bcast:192.168.0.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
...
[tideway@london01 ~]$ ping `hostname`
PING london01 (192.168.0.100) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from london01 (192.168.0.100): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.050 ms
64 bytes from london01 (192.168.0.100): icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.047 ms
64 bytes from london01 (192.168.0.100): icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.042 ms
64 bytes from london01 (192.168.0.100): icmp_seq=4 ttl=64 time=0.041 ms

--- london01 ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 received, 0% packet loss, time 3002ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.041/0.045/0.050/0.003 ms
[tideway@london01 ~]$

If the appliance cannot resolve its own hostname (there is no response from the ping command), see Changing the appliance hostname for information on changing the hostname.

Restarting the Tideway services

The final test is to log in to the appliance user interface (UI) using a web browser. You can only do this after you have restarted the tideway services. Enter the following commands:

[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service appliance start
[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service omniNames start
[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service cluster start
[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service tideway start

Next, attempt to log in to the appliance UI using a web browser.

Troubleshooting

If you cannot log in through a web browser, try stopping and restarting the services:

[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service tideway stop
[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service cluster stop
[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service omniNames stop
[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service appliance stop
[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service appliance start
[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service omniNames start
[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service cluster start
[tideway@london01 ~]$ sudo /sbin/service tideway start

Try to ping the gateway or use traceroute to the gateway. In this example, 192.168.0.1 is the gateway address provided by your system administrator. Enter the following:

[tideway@london01 ~]$ ping 192.168.0.1
PING 192.168.0.1 (192.168.0.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=127 time=0.324 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=127 time=0.450 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=127 time=0.342 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=4 ttl=127 time=0.401 ms

--- 192.168.0.1 ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 received, 0% packet loss, time 3001ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 0.324/0.379/0.450/0.051 ms
[tideway@london01 ~]$
[tideway@london01 ~]$ traceroute 192.168.0.1
traceroute to 192.168.0.1 (192.168.0.1), 30 hops max, 40 byte packets
 1  192.168.1.4 (192.168.1.4)  4.225 ms  4.377 ms  4.532 ms
 2  192.168.0.1 (192.168.0.1)  0.265 ms  0.262 ms  0.252 ms
[tideway@london01 ~]$ 

If these tests fail, contact your system administrator.

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