This documentation supports the 11.2 version of BMC Discovery.

To view an earlier version of the product, select the version from the Product version menu.

Viewing processor information

A processor information object in BMC Discovery represents a processor in a host.

To view a processor information page

From a host node, click one of the links in the Processor Information field. The Processor Information page displays.

Field

Description

Name

The name of the processor which is generated from collected data and the name of Host.

Vendor

The processor vendor. This value is normalized from the collected data. For example, "INTEL", "Intel" and "Intel Corp" will all be reported as "Intel Corporation".

Type

The processor type. This value is normalized from the collected data.

Speed

The processor speed, in MHz.

Resource Type

  • PHYSICAL for a processor on physical hardware
  • VIRTUAL for a processor on virtual hardware, such as a VMware VM
  • PARTIAL for a processor on partitioned hardware, such an AIX LPAR or Solaris Zone, where some portion of the physical processor is allocated to the machine.
  • NOT_PHYSICAL for a processor not on physical hardware, where it cannot be determined if the host is virtual or partitioned.

Number of Cores

The total number of cores in the processor.

Number of Sockets

The number of sockets used by the processor.

Cores per Socket

The number of cores per socket, as reported by the operating system.

Threads per Core

The number of threads per core, as reported by the operating system.

Cores per Socket (from Specs)

The number of cores per socket, taken from the manufacturer's specification.

Threads per Core (from Specs)

The number of threads per core, taken from the manufacturer's specification.

Host

The host containing the processor.

Example: VIRTUAL processor information

In this example, VMware is providing a virtual Xeon E5620 processor to the machine. The 4 logical processors come from the 4 single-threaded cores but a real E5620 has 2 threads per core (as per the specification). Also, the number of sockets reported by the operating system is inaccurate (It is 4 but should be 1). This is typical of hypervisors, which often make no difference between physical processors, cores, and threads. However, cores and threads have little real meaning for virtual processors as they are being emulated and do not really reflect the real physical processors.

Example: PARTIAL processor information

In this example, a Solaris Zone has been allocated one logical processor from the real physical processor. A real Xeon E5620 has 8 logical processors (4 cores, 2 threads) but this zone only has access to one of them. This is different from the virtual processor example above, as the partial processor represents part of a physical processor. As with the virtual example, values like the number of sockets are not entirely accurate but values for cores and threads do not reflect the real capabilities of the physical hardware.

Example: NOT_PHYSICAL processor information

In this example, we cannot determine if the machine is virtual or partitioned but we can tell that the processor is not real physical hardware, based on the values reported. In this case, the processor is reported as NOT_PHYSICAL. Like VIRTUAL and PARTIAL, the values for cores and threads do not reflect the real capabilities of the physical hardware.

Related topic

Managing your IT infrastructure

Was this page helpful? Yes No Submitting... Thank you

Comments