Searching for data

You can search for information in the BMC Atrium Discovery datastore from the drop-down Search box that is displayed at the top-right of each page. You can run a quick search, basic search, or an advanced search that includes additional options, including allowing you to define the set of objects to be searched and to search for destroyed objects. See Version Number and Search Bar.

To perform a quick search

  1. In the top search box, enter the keyword or text string you want to search for. To search for a phrase, enclose it in quotes (for example "apache webserver").
  2. Hit Enter or click the arrow button.

To limit the kinds of nodes found by the search, prefix the search terms with the node kind followed by a colon, for example host: test.example.com finds Host nodes matching "test.example.com".

The node kind is case insensitive. You can use any node kind defined in the taxonomy, plus the following abbreviations:

Abbreviation

Node kinds searched

tku

Pattern, PatternModule and KnowledgeUpload

si

SoftwareInstance

process

DiscoveredProcess

pattern

Pattern and PatternModule

da

DiscoveryAccess

bai

BusinessApplicationInstance

application

BusinessApplicationInstance

app

BusinessApplicationInstance

To perform a basic search

A basic search enables you to search for keywords or text strings occurring anywhere in the BMC Atrium Discovery datastore.

  1. In the top search box, enter the keyword or text string you want to search for.
  2. Under Section, choose the section of the datastore (Administration, Applications, Discovery, Infrastructure, or Change) that you want to search.
    The Any option searches all modules. See Notes on Searching for a list of the objects in each module.
  3. Under Match, choose the type of search you want to run.
    • Exact Match — Requires an exact match for an entire attribute. This search is case-sensitive.
    • Word Match — Searches for entire words (separated by spaces or punctuation) and does not find partial words or substrings. For example, if you search for "Windows", the system will return Windows XP, Windows 2000, and so on, but if you are searching for a person called Robertson, the search does not find details if you enter "Robert". This search is not case-sensitive.
  4. The Show Data Completeness check box indicates whether or not the Data Completeness indicator will be shown for each returned object. Select this check box if you need to view the data quality for all items. The default setting allows for faster searching when large numbers of objects are involved, as the system will not need to calculate data completeness values.
  5. Click Search.
    • If objects of more than one kind are found, a page is displayed listing the number of objects of each kind found.
      Click any entry in this list to display the list of objects of this kind.
    • If objects of only one kind are found, the matching ones are listed immediately. The list shows Summary attributes only, and it is possible that the text you searched for does not appear in these attributes.
  6. Click any entry to display details of the object.

Tips on searching

  • If your search returns too many matches, you can refine it by running a further search on the items.
  • You can export the results of a search in CSV format. See Exporting data in CSV format.

How advanced searching works

In an advanced search, you can search a defined set of objects for keywords or text strings, and you can opt to include destroyed objects as well as restrict your search to your own objects. You can also match against a regular expression.

If you are familiar with the Search Service and its query language you can use the Advanced Search page to enter a search query. To access the Advanced Search page, from the drop-down Search box, click Advanced Search. For a detailed description of the Search Service and query language, see the Using the Search and Reporting service. The following check boxes are provided in each advanced search section:

Section

Check box

Applications

Application Instances
Groups

Pattern Generation Information

Infrastructure

Clusters
Collections
Coupling Facilities
Database Details
Details
Disk Drives
Fibre Channel HBAs
File Systems
Files
Generic Elements
Host Containers
Hosts
IP Addresses
Load Balancer Groups
Load Balancer Instances
Load Balancer Members
Load Balancer Pools
Load Balancer Services
MF Parts

Mainframes
Network Devices
Network Interfaces
Packages
Patches
Printers
Runtime Environments
SNMP Managed Devices
Software Components
Software
Instances
Storage
Storage Collections
Storage Devices
Storage Pools
Storage System Groups
Storage Systems
Storage Volumes
Subnets

Discovery

Command Failures
Device Infos
Directory Listings
Discovered Application Component Lists
Discovered Application Components
Discovered Card Lists
Discovered Cards
Discovered Chassis
Discovered Chassis Lists
Discovered Command Results
Discovered Coupling Facilities
Discovered Coupling Facility Lists
Discovered Database Detail Lists
Discovered Database Details
Discovered Database Lists
Discovered Databases
Discovered Dependencies
Discovered Dependency Lists
Discovered Directory Entries
Discovered Disk Drive Lists
Discovered Disk Drives
Discovered FQDNs
Discovered File Systems
Discovered Files
Discovered HBAs
Discovered IP Address Lists
Discovered IP Addresses
Discovered MAC Addresses
Discovered MFPart Lists
Discovered MFParts
Discovered MQ Detail Lists
Discovered MQ Details
Discovered Mainframe Lists
Discovered Mainframes
Discovered Network Interface Lists
Discovered Network Interfaces
Discovered Packages
Discovered Patches
Discovered Processes
Discovered Program Lists
Discovered Programs
Discovered Registry Entries
Discovered Registry Values
Discovered SNMP Table Rows
Discovered SNMP Tables
Discovered SNMP Values
Discovered Services

Discovered Software
Discovered Software Lists
Discovered Storage Subsystem Lists
Discovered Storage Subsystems
Discovered Sysplex Lists
Discovered Sysplexes
Discovered Tape Drive Lists
Discovered Tape Drives
Discovered Transaction Lists
Discovered Transactions
Discovered Virtual Machines
Discovered WBEM Associations
Discovered WBEM Associators Results
Discovered WBEM Instances
Discovered WBEM Instances
Discovered WBEM Queries
Discovered WBEM Query Results
Discovered WMI Queries
Discovered WMI Query Results
Discovery Accesses
Discovery Conditions
Discovery Runs
ECA Errors
FQDN Lists
File System Lists
HBA Info Lists
Hardware Reference Data
Host Infos
Integration Points
Integration Results
Knowledge Uploads
Listening Ports
Network Connection Lists
Network Connections
Pattern Definitions
Pattern Definitions Functions
Pattern Executions
Pattern Modules
Patterns
Process Lists
Provider Accesses
Registry Listings
SQL Result Rows
Script Failures
Service Lists
Session Results
Virtual Machine Lists

Administration

Attachment Categories
Attachments
Charts
Families
Lifecycle Status

Locations
Organizational Units
People
Recovery Times
Reports

To perform an advanced search

  1. In the drop-down Search box, click Advanced Search. The Advanced Search box is displayed in the main frame.
  2. If you are familiar with the Search Service and its query language you can use the Search Query page to enter a search query. To access the Search Query page, click the Generic Search Query link. 
    For a detailed description of the Search Service and query language, see the Using the Search and Reporting service.
  3. Under Keywords, enter the keyword or text string you want to search for. (To run a Regular expression search you must enter a valid regular expression.)
  4. In the Select match type option, choose the type of matching to be performed:
    • Exact Match - Requires an exact match for an entire attribute. This search is case-sensitive.
    • Word Match - Searches for entire words (separated by spaces or punctuation) and does not find partial words or substrings. For example if you search for "Windows", the system will return Windows XP, Windows 2000, and so forth, but if you are searching for a person called Robertson, the search does not find details if you enter "Robert". This search is not case-sensitive.
    • Partial Match - Finds all occurrences of the string anywhere in the object's attributes. This search is not case-sensitive.
    • Regular Expression Match - Interprets the input keyword as a regular expression and matches against it. (See Regular Expression Searching.)
  5. Select the Include Destroyed check box if you want the search to include objects that have been destroyed. These will otherwise not be included in the search.
  6. Select the Show DQ check box if you need to view the Data Quality for all items. The default setting allows for faster searching when large numbers of objects are involved, as the system will not need to calculate data quality values.
  7. Select check boxes to indicate the kinds of object in each module (Applications, Infrastructure, Discovery, and Administration) that you want to search. You can select any number. In each module section you can click All to choose all kinds in the module or None to deselect all kinds of objects in the module.
  8. Click Search.
    • If objects of one kind are found, the matching ones are listed. The list shows Summary attributes only, and it is possible that the text you searched for does not appear in these attributes.
    • If objects of more than one kind are found, a page is displayed listing the number of objects of each kind found. Click an entry in this list to display the list of objects of this kind.
    • If the object that you were searching for was not found, click Search Again to return to the Advanced Search screen.
  9. To display the View Object page of the objects found, click the object name.

Tips on searching

  • The returned list displays summary attributes of each object only. Click an item in the list to access the View Object page which displays all of an object's relationships and attributes.
  • If your search returns too many matches, you can refine it by running a further search on the items. If the matches include destroyed items, an Include destroyed items check box is shown. Enter an additional keyword and a matching type and click Refine Search.
  • You can export the results of a search in CSV format. See Exporting data in CSV format.

To search on a regular expression

The advanced search option in BMC Atrium Discovery enables you to search by matching against a regular expression. A regular expression, or regex, is a pattern that can match various text strings. For example, A[0-9]+ matches any string that consists of the letter A followed by one or more digits.

Regular expressions have a defined syntax which enables you to define complex matching patterns. BMC Atrium Discovery uses the Python implementation; for full syntax and details of use, consult the Python documentation, see https://docs.python.org/2/library/re.html for more information.
Below are just a few of the matching characters that you can use when constructing regular expressions.

An ordinary character, or a sequence of characters, matches that character or string.

Character

Details

.

A dot matches any single character.

^

A caret matches characters at the start of the string.

$

A dollar sign matches characters at the end of the string.

*

An asterisk matches 0 or more repetitions of the preceding regex. For example, ab* will match "a", "ab", or "a" followed by any number of "b"s.

+

A plus sign matches one or more repetitions of the preceding regex. For example, ab+ will match "a" followed by any non-zero number of "b"s; it will not match just "a".

?

A question mark matches 0 or 1 repetitions of the preceding regex. For example, ab? will match either "a" or "ab".

[ ]

Square brackets are used to indicate a set of characters that can be matched. For example, asdf will match any of the characters "a", "s", "d", or "f".

|

The vertical bar is used to separate regular expressions, any or which can be matched. For example A|B will match either A or B.

\

The backslash followed by any special character matches the special character itself.

Was this page helpful? Yes No Submitting... Thank you

Comments