Unsupported content

 

This version of the documentation is no longer supported. However, the documentation is available for your convenience. You will not be able to leave comments.

Configuring network resources


In the Network Resources tab of the Resource Set Details dialog box, you configure network interface cards (NIC), virtual load balancer pools, virtual load balancer entries, and remote access ports.

Recommendations

When defining network resources (for example, Network Interface Card Details), you can tag the NIC and then use policies to match tags on networks in the container.
Make sure that the network pod configuration allows firewalls and load balancers to be used.
See the BMC Network Automation configuration for valid values in your network provider.

To configure network resources

  1. Click the Network Resources tab.
  2. In the NICs linkbar, define the NIC:
    1. Click New .
    2. In NIC Number, enter the number of the NIC within the VM's sequence of NICs.
    3. In NIC Tags, select the tag that applies to the NIC.
    4. In Network Select Method, select a tag (for example, Location[San Jose] or Network[Web]) or enter a network label (or example, Management or Public).
      The NIC tag or label is used to select the network that the NIC should be attached to (that is, routed to).
      These methods are mutually exclusive:
      • If you select Use Network Policies, the NIC Tags are used to place the NIC on the network.
        The Service Governor selects the network based on a matching tag group and tag.
      • If you select Use Label, you must place the NIC on a network that has a specific label.

        Note

        BMC strongly recommends that you use network policies for the Network Selection Method. If needed, you can type the label of a specific network, or if available, select from the recent network labels entered for this service blueprint. Labels will be deprecated in the next major release.

        Two networks in the same network container can have the same network label if they are in different zones, or if one network is in a zone and the other network is at the network container level. When you add NICs in the resource set, you can have NICs which reference a network label that are not unique in a container. As a result, when the VM NIC is being provisioned, more than one network matching that network label exists.
    5. In Private IP, specify whether the IP address used for the private network should be assigned dynamically through DHCP, or set statically in the machine configuration.
    6. In Assign NAT Address, acquire a NAT address on top of the VIP address (used for load balancing) that is acquired for the VLB oool.
      Network Address Translation provides a separate IP address to access the public network (internet).The NAT address may or may not be a publicly routable (Internet-routable) address. It could still be a private address whose purpose is to hide the VIP address from direct access.
    7. Click Add to include your changes to the NIC.
  3. Click the Virtual Load Balancer Pools linkbar to define the specifications for creating virtual load balancer (VLB) pools.
    1. In VLB Pool Name, enter the name of the load balancer (for example, Web LB).
    2. In VLB Pool Tags, select the tag that applies to the VLB pool.
    3. In Client Network Select Method, select a tag or enter a network label (for example, Main).
      This name identifies the client network (that is, the network where traffic is coming into the pool) to which the VLB pool is attached.
      These methods are mutually exclusive:
      • If you select Use VLB Pool Tags, you must select VLB Pool Tags to place the VLB pool on the network.
      • If you select Use Label, you must place the VLB Ppol on a network that has a specific label.

        Note

        BMC strongly recommends that you use VLB Pool Tags for the Client Network Selection Method. If needed, you can type the label of a specific client network, or if available, select from the recent network labels entered for this service blueprint. Labels will be deprecated in the next major release.

    4. In Assign NAT Address, acquire a NAT address on top of the VIP address (used for load balancing) that is acquired for the VLB pool.
      Network Address Translation provides a separate IP address to access the public network (internet).The NAT address may or may not be a publicly routable (Internet-routable) address. It could still be a private address whose purpose is to hide the VIP address from direct access.
    5. In Client Port, enter a port number or well-known label (for example, 1736).
    6. From the Transport Protocol menu, select a protocol (for example, TCP).
    7. In Description, enter a helpful description of the VLB rules.
    8. In Additional Parameters, click the ellipsis button to specify additional VLB pool parameters (based on the load balancer's vendor).
    9. In the Additional Parameters dialog box, select a vendor (for example, Cisco).
    10. Select a device type (for example, CS350).
    11. Select a parameter (for example, timeout).
    12. Enter a value (for example, 300 seconds).
    13. Click Add.
    14. Click OK to close the dialog box.
    15. Click Add or Update in the editor to save your changes.
  4. Click the Virtual Load Balancer Entries linkbar to define the entries in the VLB pool:
    1. Click New !.
    2. In VLB Pool Name, enter the pool name.
    3. In NIC, specify which NIC on the VM that this entry is for.
    4. To enable the VLB pool, click Enabled. Otherwise, the VLB is disabled (by default).
    5. In Server Port, enter a server port (for example, 3389). If unspecified, the VLB pool's Client Port is used as the value.
    6. Click Add.
  5. Click the Remote Access Ports linkbar to open one or more ports in the OS if the firewall is enabled.
    1. Click New .
    2. In Port, enter a port in the OS firewall (for example, 8080).
    3. From the Protocol menu, select a protocol (for example, TCP).
    4. From the Action Type menu, select the action (for example, Script).
    5. In Action, enter the action (for example, open_port_windows.nsh).
    6. Click Add.
    7. Click OK to close the Resource Set Details dialog box.
  6. Click Save to commit the blueprint and all your changes.

Related topics

Configuring compute resources
Creating service deployment definitions and resource sets
Configuring service blueprint parameters
Configuring the deployment sequence (for the service deployment definition)
Configuring post-deployment actions (for the resource set details)
Configuring post-deployment actions (for the service deployment definition)
Configuring post-deployment actions (for compute resources)
Configuring network paths

Was this page helpful? Yes No Submitting... Thank you

Comments