App Visibility end-user monitoring

TrueSight App Visibility Manager end-user monitoring provides visibility into end-to-end transaction time and availability, and browser page performance and availability, for your web-based applications. End-user data enables you to detect and respond when users are experiencing slow response times and outages. With TrueSight App Visibility Manager, you can monitor end-to-end transaction time and identify problematic parts (such as Ajax requests) of a web page.

To implement end-user monitoring, your environment must include the App Visibility proxy component. Through instrumentation by the App Visibility agents, or by manually inserting a JavaScript stub in your applications, the App Visibility proxy processes end-user performance and availability data and events. If users experience long end-to-end time, problematic Ajax requests, or errors, an event is sent to the TrueSight App Visibility Manager system.

End-user data is available only for browser-based rich Internet applications (RIAs) that are based on HTML and JavaScript. End-user data might not be available for native mobile applications or desktop applications.

End-user data is displayed through the User tier and Network tier in the Application View. These tiers show the number of active users, and what percentage of them are adversely impacted by application performance and availability. TrueSight App Visibility Manager adds the BMCTSEUM cookie to the browsers of end users and reads the cookies to monitor user experience.


Related topics

System requirements for App Visibility Manager server components

Manually setting up active end-user monitoring

App Visibility proxy server deployment guidelines

Installing App Visibility Manager components

Analyzing end-user experience with the User tier

Analyzing user transaction details


End-user experience metrics

The end-user experience metrics enable you to monitor and measure the performance of your web-based applications from the perspective of your users. The metrics measure the duration of page navigation events, which enable you to identify areas of concern or interest.

The following diagram displays the monitored metrics for page navigation timing events, in the order they occur. Each metric is described in the table below.

End-user experience metrics for page navigation
Click to enlarge image.

Descriptions of end-user experience metrics for page navigation times

Item in
diagram

Name

Description

1.

Page Load Time

End-to-end page response time, the entire time it takes to load the page, from initial request to the browser finishes processing the page

2.

Page DNS Time

Time for the browser to complete the required domain lookup while retrieving a resource

3.

Page TCP Time

Time for the browser to establish a connection with the server, including other time intervals such as SSL handshakes and SOCKS authentication

4.

Page SSL Time

Time for the browser to perform the SSL handshake to secure the connection

5.

Page Back-End Time

Time spent on server and network


Network Time

Time spent on network between the client and server

To see the server time, you must have an App Visibility agent for Java or .NET installed on the relevant servers. For details, see Getting started with setting up applications for monitoring.


Server Time

Time spent on the web server, server applications, and databases

To see the server time, you must have an App Visibility agent for Java or .NET installed on the relevant servers. For details, see Getting started with setting up applications for monitoring.

6.

Time to First Byte (TTFB)

Time that the browser waits to receive the first piece of information

7.

Page Download Time

Time for the browser to download response from server

8.

Page Front-End Time

Time for the browser to process the critical rendering path of the request, including parsing, rendering, downloading sources, and executing JavaScript functions

9.

DOM Processing to Interactive

Time that the browser spends loading the web page until the user can start interacting with it

10.

DOM Interactive to Complete

Time for the browser to load images and videos, and to execute JavaScript code that listens for the DOMContentLoaded event

11.

Onload Time

Time for the browser to execute JavaScript code that waits for the window.load event

12.

Ajax E2E Time

Time taken for the end-to-end process from the initial request to the browser receiving the Ajax content

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