Important

   

Starting version 8.9.03, BMC Server Automation is renamed to TrueSight Server Automation. This space contains information about BMC Server Automation 8.9.02 and previous versions. For TrueSight Server Automation 8.9.03 and later releases, see TrueSight Server Automation 8.9.

Stocking a data store with Windows drivers

While Microsoft Windows installation files can be used to install the Windows operating system on various types of hardware, Windows drivers are often specific to a particular hardware configuration. You must stock the data store with Windows drivers for your hardware configurations.

BMC recommends that you:

  • Store hardware-specific drivers in unique locations under the root directory of the data store.
  • Create a different system package for each hardware configuration that you want to provision.

The procedure you use for stocking the data store with Windows drivers depends on the type of driver:

About the drivers directory

Driver files are almost always required for inclusion in the WINPE boot images for Windows operating systems and rarely required for Linux operating system images. The drivers directory acts as a repository for drivers you need to include in the WINPE boot images. The drivers that you require depend on your environment. Some typically required drivers include those for network interface cards (NICs) and storage area network (SAN) appliances. Other possible drivers are those for tools that implement scripts that you plan to include in the WinPE image. For example, if you include a script in the boot image for an out-of-band manager to configure a RAID storage system, you might need drivers to accompany the script.

To stock the data store with drivers for Windows 2008 or later

  1. In the data store, create a separate directory for each hardware configuration that you plan to provision. (You do not need to set up a $OEM$ directory for Windows 2008 or later drivers.)
  2. Copy the files for the Windows plug-and-play (PnP) and mass storage drivers to the directory you created.
    For example, you might create a directory structure based on manufacturer and server model type similar to the following example:

To stock the data store with drivers for other Windows operating systems

Unattended installations of Microsoft Windows 2003 operating systems use special directories called $OEM$ to access hardware-specific drivers. When setting up the data store, create a separate $OEM$ directory for each hardware configuration you plan to provision. For example, you could set up a directory structure similar to the following example:


When you create a system package for Windows, specify the path to hardware-specific drivers using the Path to $OEM$ directory field on the Computer Settings panel in BMC Server Automation. For example, if you set up a directory structure like the one shown in the preceding figure, you could enter the following value for the Path to $OEM$ directory:

drivers/Compaq

The path that you enter is relative to the root directory of the data store. Do not include the $OEM$ directory in the path.

For instructions about setting up a data store for Windows plug and play drivers, see Plug-and-play drivers. For instructions about setting up a data store for SCSI or RAID controller drivers, see To stock SCSI and RAID controller drivers.

Plug-and-play drivers

This section describes how to stock a data store with Microsoft Windows plug-and-play drivers.

Each time the Windows operating system starts, it loads the drivers for the server's plug-and-play (PnP) hardware. Windows searches for these drivers in all of the locations specified in its PnP driver path. In order for Windows to find those drivers, the provisioning process must:

  • Store the correct files on the server's file system.
  • Include the location of those files in the server's PnP driver path.

To stock the data store with plug-and-play drivers for Windows 2008 or later

PnP and textmode drivers for Windows 2008 operating systems can reside at any location in the data store; they are not required to reside in the $OEM$ directory. For information on where to store these drivers in the data store, see To stock the data store with drivers for Windows 2008 or later.

To stock the data store with plug-and-play drivers for all other Windows operating systems

To ensure that plug and play drivers are stored in the server's file system during provisioning, use the $OEM$ directory and another special directory called $1. The $1 directory represents the drive and partition of the server that you are provisioning. The provisioning process copies any files or directories that exist under $OEM$\$1 to the target server.

To provide drivers to the text-based section of the Microsoft Windows installer, you need to create a directory called TEXTMODE below $OEM$. This new TEXTMODE directory should be set up at the same level as the $1 directory. It must contain at least one file, though this file can contain any content and can be of any size.

When setting up the data store, use a directory structure similar to the one shown in the following figure for plug-and-play drivers:


If your directory structure is set up like the one shown above and the Path to $OEM$ directory field in the Computer Settings panel of a Windows system package is set to drivers/Compaq, the provisioning process copies the display and network directories to the C: directory of the target server.

For Windows to know the location of the drivers that you have copied to the C: directory, the paths to these locations must be appended to the Windows PnP driver path. The PnP driver path is a semicolon-delimited list of paths relative to the C: directory. When defining a Windows system package, use the PnP driver path field on the Computer Settings panel to specify the paths you want appended to the Windows PnP driver path.

For example, if the data store is structured like the one shown in the preceding figure, and the Path to $OEM$ directory field in the Computer Settings panel of a Windows system package is set to drivers/Compaq, the PnP driver path field should be display;network.

For more information about using the Computer Settings panel when defining a Windows system package, see the Computer settings - Windows operating systems earlier than Windows 2008.

Example

Assume

  • The data store instance resides at E:\Pxestore
  • The drivers path on the data store is a: E:\Pxestore\drivers
  • The individual driver sets are broken down by manufacturer and server model type
  • The vendor name is Vendor1 and the server model is Model1

In this example, the drivers for the server model Model1 reside at E:\Pxestore\drivers\Vendor1\Model1. Also, the value for the Path to $OEM$ directory field in the Computer Settings panel in the BMC Server Automation Console is drivers\Vendor1\Model1 because this path is always relative to the data store being used.

For PnP drivers, create a folder called $1 below the $OEM$ folder and place the PnP drivers in it. You can also separate individual driver sets by placing them in their own subdirectories below $1.

Example


E:\Pxestore\drivers\Vendor1\Model1\$OEM$\$1\lan
E:\Pxestore\drivers\Vendor1\Model1\$OEM$\$1\video
E:\Pxestore\drivers\Vendor1\Model1\$OEM$\$1\audio

In the PnP driver path field in the Computer Settings panel, specify lan;video;audio. This path points the PnP drivers to the individual subdirectories below $1. Each of these subdirectories is copied to the same drive and partition in which Windows is being installed.

For textmode drivers (typically SCSI, SATA, and RAID disk drivers), create a folder called textmode below the $OEM$ folder and place any driver sets required for the textmode section of the Windows installer in it.

Example

E:\Pxestore\drivers\Vendor1\Model1\$OEM$\TEXTMODE

These drivers must also be referenced in the MassStorageDrivers and OEMBootFiles sections of the Unattend Entries file. For more information, see the Using WIM images to provision Windows servers.

To stock SCSI and RAID controller drivers

During an interactive installation of the Windows operating system, the system prompts you to insert a disk containing SCSI or RAID controller drivers. An unattended Windows installation, however, must provide SCSI and RAID controller drivers by storing them in a directory called TEXTMODE under the $OEM$ directory. Obtain SCSI and RAID controller drivers, along with another essential file called txtsetup.oem, from the hardware manufacturer.

Note

SCSI and RAID controller drivers for Windows 2008 operating systems are not required to reside in the $OEM$ directory; they can reside at any location in the data store. For information, see To stock the data store with drivers for Windows 2008 or later.

If your hardware configuration requires SCSI or RAID controller drivers, create a directory structure like the one shown in the following figure. Store the SCSI and RAID controller drivers as well as the txtsetup.oem file in the TEXTMODE directory. The TEXTMODE directory should not contain subdirectories.


When defining a Windows system package that provisions a server with SCSI or RAID controller drivers, you must use the Unattended Entries shortcut in Advanced Options to provide essential driver information, as described in Unattend entries - Windows operating systems earlier than Windows 2008.

Was this page helpful? Yes No Submitting... Thank you

Comments